How-To Enable Per App Tablet Mode and more!

If like me, you prefer to use the stock ROM that came with your phone and modify it instead of using someone else’s heavily edited ROM, then you know how challenging it is to keep a record of the changes you made. Either we create our own application or rely on the good ol’ terminal to do things. Well, for Linux users, it is not a problem at all, but for Windows users, it is very discouraging.

One modification that any Android user want is to be able to use apps in tablet mode using a non-tablet gadget, especially if you have a phablet. There are two ways to achieve this, [1] the most common suggestion “use this_ROM and that_ROM”; and [2] the more logical way, is to edit each app (some you have to decompile and recompile).

Again, the first option is out of the question, we want to use the stock ROM! but at the same time, we do not want to edit each app – which after it updates, we have to re-edit it again. Hassle, right? It ends today! Welcome Xposed Framework and the module Xposed App Settings.

Xposed Framework
Xposed Framework

We need two (2) apps to make this work, first Xposed Framework and second Xposed App Settings. In addition, you need to have a rooted Android phone. (And do not forget to backup your phone first.)

What does Xposed Framework do?

Instead, I extended the /system/bin/app_process executable to load a JAR file on startup. The classes of this file will sit in every process (including the system_server) and can act with their powers. And even more: I have implemented something that allows developers to replace any method in any class (may it be in the framework, systemui or a custom app). This makes Xposed very powerful, it is basically running in “god mode”. You can change parameters for the method call, modify the return value or skip the call to the method completely – it’s all up to you! Also replacing or adding resources is easy.

What is Xposed App Settings?

Xposed Framework-App Settings
Xposed Framework-App Settings

This mod targets settings which all apps share, such as the language, what permissions they require, what is the DPI for rendering, the perceived screen size (which affects the alternate resources that are loaded) and allows you to change those values on a per-app basis.

You can therefore have some apps rendered with a lower DPI than the default for your device in order to see more info at once (with no build.prop changes), while others might have different DPI values because their resources are not prepared for different densities. The same for the language, permissions to revoke, etc.

Source: Xposed App Settings

Install Xposed Framework and Xposed App Settings

  1. Download Xposed Framework here – scroll-down to the Attached Files section and get the latest (as of this writing, the latest version is XposedInstaller_2.1.2.apk)
  2. Download Xposed App Settings here – the latest version as of this writing is v0.2
  3. Install both apps
  4. Run Xposed Framework to install it
  5. Reboot your phone
  6. Run Xposed Framework again
  7. Go to the Modules tab
  8. Check the checkbox for Xposed App Settings
  9. Reboot your phone
  10. Run Xposed App Settings

What can you do with it?

Now that we have installed the apps on your phone, what can we do with it? Here are some applications I’ve edited via Xposed App Settings that you might like. But before I show you how, I want you to know that the settings below were based and tested on my phone, with the following specs:

  • Model: my|phone A919 Duo
  • Screen: 127 mm (5″)
  • DPI: 240
  • Resolution: 480×854
  • OS: Android 4.0.4 ICS with Linux Kernel 3.0.13

If you do not know the DPI of your phone, download the app ScreenInfo. Or use your favourite app that provides such information.

Make Gmail Run in Tablet Mode

Xposed Framework-App Settings-Gmail :: 170 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Gmail in Tablet Mode (Portrait)
Xposed Framework-App Settings-Firefox :: 170 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Gmail in Tablet Mode (Portrait)

  1. Run Xposed App Settings
  2. Look for Gmail and tap it
  3. On the top-right corner of your screen, switch it to On
  4. On the DPI field, enter 170
  5. On the Screen field, choose 600×1024
  6. Then look for Screen on and enable it by tapping the checkbox (prevents the phone screen from turning-off)
  7. On the top-right corner of your screen, tap the save icon, then tap the Yes button
  8. Open your Gmail app and voila, it’s on tablet mode!
Xposed Framework-App Settings-Firefox :: 170 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Gmail in Tablet Mode (Landscape)

Xposed Framework-App Settings-Firefox :: 170 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Gmail in Tablet Mode (Landscape)

Make Chrome Better

Xposed Framework-App Settings-Chrome :: default settings
Chrome :: default settings

  1. Run Xposed App Settings
  2. Look for Chrome and tap it
  3. On the top-right corner of your screen, switch it to On
  4. On the DPI field, enter 160 or 170
  5. Optional: If you used 160 dpi, then on the Screen field, choose “600×1024”
  6. On the top-right corner of your screen, tap the save icon, then tap the Yes button
  7. Open your Chrome app and see the changes

For my phone, choosing 160 dpi and 600×1024 screen resolution crashes Chrome when closing tabs. I am instead using 170 dpi, which is enough for me. Additionally, for my phone, Chrome can not go lower than 160 dpi.

Xposed Framework-App Settings-Chrome :: 170 dpi
Chrome :: 170 dpi
Xposed Framework-App Settings-Chrome :: 160 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Chrome :: 160 dpi;
600×1024 resolution

Increase Firefox Screen Space

  1. Run Xposed App Settings
  2. Look for Firefox and tap it
  3. On the top-right corner of your screen, switch it to On
  4. On the DPI field, enter 170
  5. On the Screen field, choose 600×1024
  6. On the top-right corner of your screen, tap the save icon, then tap the Yes button
  7. Open Firefox and enjoy more screen space
Xposed Framework-App Settings-Firefox :: default settings
Firefox :: default settings
Xposed Framework-App Settings-Firefox :: 170 dpi; 600x1024 resolution
Firefox :: 170 dpi;
600×1024 resolution

More Settings Available

There are more settings available that you can change, however, for the example applications above, the other settings are not needed at least for my use. These settings are:

  • Font scale
  • xlarge res
  • Locale
  • Fullscreen
  • No Title
  • Orientation
  • Resident Notifications
  • Insistent Notifications
  • Permissions

Example, you can lock Gmail’s orientation to landscape, or change the default language to Chinese. Or make Chrome or Firefox run in fullscreen mode or increase the font size of the browser. All you have to do is to experiment and find the comfortable settings that suits you.

Enjoy!

Source: A How-To Video by zedomax


Go back to: myAndroid Hub

Is a self-confessed bibliophile and technophile other than being an early adopter, an avid gamer, a geek, nerd, role-player, anime otaku, and trekker.

His first online project was in 1998 when he launched the unofficial website for Ansalon MUD and his own community forums Laibcoms.Community. By 2003 he created his work blog GM-Yukino which grew into gameshogun™, Snoworld™, and techmagus™.

His website is jcsesecuneta.com and 1way.faith. He also owns Clean Real Food, YourOnly.One, Adorable & Beautiful, and other online properties.

CC BY-SA 4.0 How-To Enable Per App Tablet Mode and more! by Yuki is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at Legal Notice.

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